Funds of the District

Ad Valorem Levies. Revenue from all taxable properties within the District based upon property valuation. 

    • General Fund. The ad valorem levy used to pay for most of the general administration, operations, and consultants costs and may be used for the construction, implementation, and maintenance of projects that are of common benefit to the District.
    • Basic Water Management Project Fund.  An valorem levy is used to pay for the costs attributable to the basic water management features of projects initiated by petition of a political subdivision (county, city, township, SWCD, school district, or other political subdivision of the state within the District or by petition of at least 50 resident owners whose property is within the District. The District may levy for up to 15 consecutive years. The LMP-01 Project was established on July 15, 2010 by a petition from the City of Detroit Lakes, to undertake Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) research, surveys, education, treatments, and management.  The DCM-01 Project is currently being established (May 2021).  The City of Detroit Lakes petitioned the District in 2020 to undertake data collection, monitoring, research, and special study activities.
    • Survey and Data Acquisition Fund.  The District may make a special  ad valorem levy once every 5 years to pay for lake and stream monitoring, surveys, and data collection work. The District uses these funds to pay for water quality monitoring  and special projects..

Special Assessments.  A tax levied on a parcel to pay fo local public improvements for a targeted benefit on the property, Special assessment taxes are used to pay the ongoing costs and repairs for the established projects.

    • Project 1B  (Melissa and Sallie Lakes). Project 1B was established by landowner petition on October 8, 1984 for control and management of aquatic vegetation in lakes Sallie and Melissa.
    • Project 1C (Detroit and Curfman Lakes). Project 1C was established by landowner petition on September 21, 1989 for the control of aquatic vegetation in Detroit and Curfman lake.
    • Becker County 11-12 Drainage System (Campbell Creek (Moon Lake to Floyd Lake). This fund pays for the costs of maintaining drainage for agricultural lands such as annual inspections, reviewing plans for bridge and culvert installations or replacements, mitigating flowage obstructions and sediment accumulation, and enforcing use of vegetated buffers. 
    • Becker County 13 Drainage System (Pelican River from Little Floyd Lake to Detroit Lake).This fund pays for the costs of maintaining drainage for agricultural lands such as annual inspections, reviewing plans for bridge and culvert installations or replacements, mitigating flowage obstructions and sediment accumulation, and enforcing use of vegetated buffers. 
    • Becker County 14 Drainage System (St. Clair Lake area).This fund pays for the costs of maintaining drainage for agricultural lands such as annual inspections, reviewing plans for bridge and culvert installations or replacements, mitigating flowage obstructions and sediment accumulation, and enforcing use of vegetated buffers. 
    • Drainage Buffer Enforcement—The District annually receives funds  from the State of MN to enforce the buffer requirements on Becker County 11,12,13, and 14 drainage systems. 

Water Management Districts. These funds can be used to build, construct, reconstruct, repair, enlarge, improve, or an any other manner obtain storm water systems, including mains, holding areas, treatment ponds, and related facilities for the collection and disposal of storm water.  On February 16, 2000,  a district-wide Storm Water Treatment Facility Project  was established to implement water quality projects,  storm water management programs, and capital improvement projects to provide recreational benefits, navigational benefits, and preservation and improvement of water quality within the District. The District may establish up to eight (8) water management districts based upon the District’s water management areas (see Our Waters) fo fund projects that are considered to not have district-wide benefit or impact.

    • Storm Water Utility Charges. Fees are charged based on a parcel’s relative contribution of nutrients and the rate of storm water runoff to a downstream waterbody. The Fees collected are based on the amount of funds that must be expended to control  or treat the runoff.